Monday, October 16, 2006

"The Thin Red Line"

I finally saw "The Thin Red Line." It was on HBO today and I was sorry to miss the first 25 minutes.

I think this was ten times the artistic achievement that "Saving Private Ryan" was.

It was exquisite; a war film without any patriotism in it at all. It was full of death and fear and violence, but not in a way that glorifies the death and violence of war.

It proposed an entirely new version of masculine strength I have never seen before. If I hadn't known better, I might have thought it was directed by someone like Jane Campion.

I think I would like to own it, and to watch it many times. It may be one of my favorite films. Not because I loved it that much, but because I was so grateful for the different and new way of seeing soldiers portrayed as deeply soulful men.

4 Comments:

Blogger LaReinaCobre said...

I'm glad that someone else has seen and appreciated this movie. It is my favorite film; I've seen it many times over the years. I credit this film with helping me to ask tough questions of myself, and also with eventually leading me to the UU faith.

04:38  
Blogger PeaceBang said...

I knew that you loved it, which is one of the main reasons I put aside my homework yesterday and watched it.

09:13  
Blogger LaReinaCobre said...

=)

23:13  
Blogger Sun Warrior said...

Interesting how a taboo can actually shed some light on true masculinity.

Wisdom comes in the weirdest ways.

Now if we can just use that to shed some light on the warrior heart of God, we might be able to repair our perception of the 'comforting and nurturing God.'

It's a stretch. Our pain allergy is quite strong. What's harder to go through: childbirth or the slaughter of the battlefield? Why do men come out deepened by it? World War II vets were used to hardships from the Great Depression. But today's soldiers come from a society with little wisdom about pain. So the soul casualties are much higher from the trauma, because they go in with little language on the subject.

12:23  

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